The use of edible gold

The earliest records of the use of gold for medicinal and healing purposes come from Alexandria, Egypt.
Over 5,000 years ago, the Egyptians ingested gold for mental, bodily and spiritual purification. The Alchemists of Alexandria developed an "elixir" made of liquid gold, they believed that gold was a mystical metal that represented the perfection of matter and that its presence in the body would enliven, rejuvenate, and cure a multitude of diseases as well as restore youth and perfect health.
 

In medieval Europe, gold-coated pills and "gold waters" were extremely popular. Alchemists mixed powdered gold into drinks to "comfort sore limbs," which is one of the earliest references to arthritis.  Gold has been used to treat arthritis continuously since 1927.

In the 1900s, surgeons would often implant a gold piece under the skin near an inflamed joint, such as a knee or elbow. As a result, the pain would often subside or cease altogether.

In China, the restorative properties of gold are still honoured in rural villages, where peasants cook their rice with a gold coin to replenish the mineral in their bodies, and fancy Chinese restaurants put 24-karat gold-leaf in their food preparations.

In the nineteenth century, Colloidal Gold was commonly used in the United States to cure alcoholism (then called dipsomania, defined as the uncontrollable craving for alcoholic liquors), and today it is used to reduce dependency on alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, and carbohydrates.

In the United States, as far back as 1885, gold had been known for its healing capabilities for the heart and improved blood circulation.

In July of 1935, Clinical, Medicine & Surgery had an article entitled "Colloidal Gold in Inoperable Cancer" written by Edward H. Ochsner, M.D., B.S., F.A.C.S. which stated, "When the condition is hopeless, Colloidal Gold helps prolong life and makes life much more bearable, both to the patient and to those about them, because it shortens the period of terminal cachexia (general physical wasting and malnutrition usually associated with chronic disease) and greatly reduces pain and discomfort and the need of opiates (narcotics) in a majority of instances."

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